Archive for November, 2013

November 21: Disability Rights

This week, we will focus on the transatlantic origins of disability rights movements in the United States, Great Britain, and Germany, as well as the recent transfer of these movements to other countries.  We will also explore the emergence of disability identities and disability pride in the late twentieth century.

Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

Please also post one of the following:

  • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
  • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

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READINGS FOR NOVEMBER 21

Establishing Disability Rights

  • Susan Schwartzenberg, Becoming Citizens: Family Life and the Politics of Disability (University of Washington Press, 2005), pp. 5-9, 18-27, 35-41, 63-65 (MavSpace)
  • Tom Shakespeare, “The Social Model of Disability,” in The Disability Studies Reader, Third Edition, ed. Lennard J. Davis (Routledge, 2010), pp. 266-273 (MavSpace)
  • Paul Hunt, “The Critical Condition,” in Stigma: The Experience of Disability (Geoffrey Chapman, 1966) (MavSpace)
  • Paul K. Longmore, “Why I Burned My Book,” in Why I Burned My Book and Other Essays about Disability (Temple University Press, 2005), pp. 230-261 (MavSpace)
  • Paul K. Longmore, “The Disability Rights Movement: Activism in the 1970s and Beyond,” in Paul Longmore, Why I Burned My Book and Other Essays on Disability (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2003), p. 102-115 (MavSpace)


The Transmission of Disability Rights

  • “Disability Rights, Disability Culture, Disability Studies” (ch. 7) and “German/American Bodies Politic” (ch. 8) in Carol Poore, Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture, pp. 273-323 (MavSpace)
    ***ch. 7:  Robert, Christopher, Lydia, Jacque, Dalton, and Bryan
    ***ch. 8: Mike, Matthew, Cory, and Jacob
  • Thomas F. Burke, “The European Union and the Diffusion of Disability Rights,” in Transatlantic Policymaking in an Age of Austerity: Diversity and Drift, ed. Martin A. Levin & Martin Shapiro (Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 158-176 (MavSpace)

November 14: War, Technology, & Disability Communities

This week, we will focus on the emergence of disability communities—communities organized around their members’ shared status of having a disability—with particular emphasis on disabled veterans’ organizations.  We will also investigate the ways in which transnational technology and policy transfers, as well as interpersonal interactions, helped both make the emergence of these communities possible and lay the groundwork for the disability rights movements that arose in the mid-twentieth century.

Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

Please also post one of the following:

  • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
  • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

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READINGS FOR NOVEMBER 14

Veterans & the State

  1. David A. Gerber, “Disabled Veterans, the State, and the Experience of Disabled Veterans in Western Societies, 1914-1915,” Journal of Social History 36, no. 4 (Summer 2003): 899-916 (MavSpace)
  2. Deborah Cohen, “Will to Work,” Disabled Veterans in Britain and Germany after the First World War,” in Disabled Veterans in History, ed. David A. Gerber (University of Michigan Press, 2000), 295-321 (MavSpace)
  3. Sarah F. Rose, “The Right to a College Education? The GI Bill, Public Law 16, and Disabled Veterans,” Journal of Policy History 24, no. 1 (Winter 2012): 26-52 (MavSpace)

Early Disability Rights Organizing

  1. Carol Poore, “Recovering Disability Rights in the Weimar Republic,” Radical History Review 94 (Winter 2006), 38-58 (MavSpace)
  2. Paul K. Longmore and David Goldberger, “The League of the Physically Handicapped and the Great Depression: A Case Study in the New Disability History,” Journal of American History 87, no. 3 (December 2000): 888-922 (MavSpace)

Technology and Community (choose one of the following)

  1. Mary Tremblay, “Going Back to Civvy Street: A Historical Account of the Impact of the Everest and Jennings Wheelchair for Canadian World War II Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury,” Disability & Society 11, no. 2 (1996): 149-169 (MavSpace)
  2. Julie Anderson and Neil Pemberton, “Walking Alone: Aiding the War and Civilian Blind in the Inter-War Period,” European Review of History—Revue européenne d’Histoire 14, no. 4 (December 2007): 459-479 (MavSpace)
  3. Julie Anderson, ‘”Turned into Taxpayers”: Paraplegia, Rehabilitation and Sport at Stoke Mandeville 1944-1956’, Journal of Contemporary History 38 (3) (2003): 461-476 (MavSpace)

November 7: The Eugenic Atlantic: Building a Better Citizenry

This week, we will focus on the eugenics movement(s).  While the history of the eugenics movement has often been placed in transnational context, especially transatlantic context, scholars have only recently begun to investigate the role of concepts of disability in eugenics and the effects on the lives of people with disabilities.

Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

Please also post one of the following:

  • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
  • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

***

READINGS FOR NOVEMBER 7TH

1)     Stefan Kühl, The Nazi Connection: Eugenics, American Racism, and German National Socialism (Oxford University Press, 2002)

2)     “Disability and Nazi Culture” in Carol Poore, Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture (University of Michigan Press, 2009), 67-134 (MavSpace)

3)     Philippa Levine and Alison Bashford, “Introduction: Eugenics and the Modern World,” in The Oxford Handbook of the History of Eugenics, eds. Alison Bashford and Philippa Levine (Oxford University Press, 2010), 1-25 (MavSpace)

4)     Choose one of the following case studies:

  • Pamela Block, “Institutional Utopias, Eugenics, and Intellectual Disability in Brazil,” History and Anthropology 18, no. (June 2007): 177-196 (MavSpace)
  • “‘To End the Degeneration of a Nation’:  Debates on Eugenic Sterilization in Interwar Romania,” Medical History 53(1) (January 2009):  77-104 (MavSpace)