Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

November 21: Disability Rights

This week, we will focus on the transatlantic origins of disability rights movements in the United States, Great Britain, and Germany, as well as the recent transfer of these movements to other countries.  We will also explore the emergence of disability identities and disability pride in the late twentieth century.

Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

Please also post one of the following:

  • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
  • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

***

READINGS FOR NOVEMBER 21

Establishing Disability Rights

  • Susan Schwartzenberg, Becoming Citizens: Family Life and the Politics of Disability (University of Washington Press, 2005), pp. 5-9, 18-27, 35-41, 63-65 (MavSpace)
  • Tom Shakespeare, “The Social Model of Disability,” in The Disability Studies Reader, Third Edition, ed. Lennard J. Davis (Routledge, 2010), pp. 266-273 (MavSpace)
  • Paul Hunt, “The Critical Condition,” in Stigma: The Experience of Disability (Geoffrey Chapman, 1966) (MavSpace)
  • Paul K. Longmore, “Why I Burned My Book,” in Why I Burned My Book and Other Essays about Disability (Temple University Press, 2005), pp. 230-261 (MavSpace)
  • Paul K. Longmore, “The Disability Rights Movement: Activism in the 1970s and Beyond,” in Paul Longmore, Why I Burned My Book and Other Essays on Disability (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2003), p. 102-115 (MavSpace)


The Transmission of Disability Rights

  • “Disability Rights, Disability Culture, Disability Studies” (ch. 7) and “German/American Bodies Politic” (ch. 8) in Carol Poore, Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture, pp. 273-323 (MavSpace)
    ***ch. 7:  Robert, Christopher, Lydia, Jacque, Dalton, and Bryan
    ***ch. 8: Mike, Matthew, Cory, and Jacob
  • Thomas F. Burke, “The European Union and the Diffusion of Disability Rights,” in Transatlantic Policymaking in an Age of Austerity: Diversity and Drift, ed. Martin A. Levin & Martin Shapiro (Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 158-176 (MavSpace)

November 14: War, Technology, & Disability Communities

This week, we will focus on the emergence of disability communities—communities organized around their members’ shared status of having a disability—with particular emphasis on disabled veterans’ organizations.  We will also investigate the ways in which transnational technology and policy transfers, as well as interpersonal interactions, helped both make the emergence of these communities possible and lay the groundwork for the disability rights movements that arose in the mid-twentieth century.

Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

Please also post one of the following:

  • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
  • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

***

READINGS FOR NOVEMBER 14

Veterans & the State

  1. David A. Gerber, “Disabled Veterans, the State, and the Experience of Disabled Veterans in Western Societies, 1914-1915,” Journal of Social History 36, no. 4 (Summer 2003): 899-916 (MavSpace)
  2. Deborah Cohen, “Will to Work,” Disabled Veterans in Britain and Germany after the First World War,” in Disabled Veterans in History, ed. David A. Gerber (University of Michigan Press, 2000), 295-321 (MavSpace)
  3. Sarah F. Rose, “The Right to a College Education? The GI Bill, Public Law 16, and Disabled Veterans,” Journal of Policy History 24, no. 1 (Winter 2012): 26-52 (MavSpace)

Early Disability Rights Organizing

  1. Carol Poore, “Recovering Disability Rights in the Weimar Republic,” Radical History Review 94 (Winter 2006), 38-58 (MavSpace)
  2. Paul K. Longmore and David Goldberger, “The League of the Physically Handicapped and the Great Depression: A Case Study in the New Disability History,” Journal of American History 87, no. 3 (December 2000): 888-922 (MavSpace)

Technology and Community (choose one of the following)

  1. Mary Tremblay, “Going Back to Civvy Street: A Historical Account of the Impact of the Everest and Jennings Wheelchair for Canadian World War II Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury,” Disability & Society 11, no. 2 (1996): 149-169 (MavSpace)
  2. Julie Anderson and Neil Pemberton, “Walking Alone: Aiding the War and Civilian Blind in the Inter-War Period,” European Review of History—Revue européenne d’Histoire 14, no. 4 (December 2007): 459-479 (MavSpace)
  3. Julie Anderson, ‘”Turned into Taxpayers”: Paraplegia, Rehabilitation and Sport at Stoke Mandeville 1944-1956’, Journal of Contemporary History 38 (3) (2003): 461-476 (MavSpace)

November 7: The Eugenic Atlantic: Building a Better Citizenry

This week, we will focus on the eugenics movement(s).  While the history of the eugenics movement has often been placed in transnational context, especially transatlantic context, scholars have only recently begun to investigate the role of concepts of disability in eugenics and the effects on the lives of people with disabilities.

Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

Please also post one of the following:

  • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
  • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

***

READINGS FOR NOVEMBER 7TH

1)     Stefan Kühl, The Nazi Connection: Eugenics, American Racism, and German National Socialism (Oxford University Press, 2002)

2)     “Disability and Nazi Culture” in Carol Poore, Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture (University of Michigan Press, 2009), 67-134 (MavSpace)

3)     Philippa Levine and Alison Bashford, “Introduction: Eugenics and the Modern World,” in The Oxford Handbook of the History of Eugenics, eds. Alison Bashford and Philippa Levine (Oxford University Press, 2010), 1-25 (MavSpace)

4)     Choose one of the following case studies:

  • Pamela Block, “Institutional Utopias, Eugenics, and Intellectual Disability in Brazil,” History and Anthropology 18, no. (June 2007): 177-196 (MavSpace)
  • “‘To End the Degeneration of a Nation’:  Debates on Eugenic Sterilization in Interwar Romania,” Medical History 53(1) (January 2009):  77-104 (MavSpace)

October 31 (Week 11): Rehabilitating the Nation

This week, we will focus on the transatlantic emergence of rehabilitation programs aimed at “restoring” disabled veterans to breadwinner statuses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  Rehabilitators, policymakers and, at times, disabled veterans borrowed from each others’ programs and advocacy efforts.

Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

Please also post one of the following:

  • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
  • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

***

1)     Beth Linker, The War’s Waste: Rehabilitation in World War I America (University of Chicago Press, 2011)

2)     Jennifer Davis McDaid, “‘How a One-Legged Rebel Lives’: Confederate Veterans and Artificial Limbs in Virginia,” in Katherine Ott, David Serlin, and Stephen Mihm, eds., Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics in America (NYU Press, 2002), pp. 119-143 (MavSpace)

3)     Choose one of the following:

    • Greg Eghigian, “The Regenerative Welfare State: Therapy, Work, and the Birth of Rehabilitation, 1884-1914,” in Making Security Social, Disability, Insurance, and the Birth of the Social Entitlement State in Germany (University of Michigan Press, 2000), pp. 117-158 (MavSpace)
    • Seth Koven, “Remembering and Dismemberment: Crippled Children, Wounded Soldiers, and the Great War in Britain,” American Historical Review 99, no. 4 (October 1994): 1167-1202 (MavSpace)
    • Joanna Bourke, “Effeminancy, Ethnicity, and the End of Trauma: The Sufferings of ‘Shell Shocked’ Men in Great Britain and Ireland, 1914-1939,” Journal of Contemporary History 35, no. 1 (2000): 57-69 (MavSpace)

      October 17 (Week 9): Migration and the Costs of Care

      Note: Enabling Disability: Disability Studies at UT Arlington conference happens today, October 17th: 12:30-5:00 pm in Chemistry and Physics Building (CPB) 303

      This week we will continue exploring the impact of industrialization on notions of disability, the “fit citizen” or colonial subject, migration patterns, and experiences of people with disabilities and their families.

      Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

      Please also post one of the following:

      • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
      • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

      If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

      ***

      READINGS FOR OCTOBER 17

      1)     Julie Livingston, Debility and the Moral Imagination in Botswana (Indiana University Press, 2005)

      2)     Natalia Molina, “Medicalizing the Mexican: Immigration, Race, and Disability in the Early-Twentieth-Century United States,” Radical History Review 94 (Winter 2006): 22-37 (MavSpace)

      October 10 (Week 8): Capitalism and Cultures of Risk and Disability

      This week we will focus on the relationship between disability and the spread of industrial capitalism, as well as the ways in which the disabling effects of industrial workplaces reshaped relationships between the nation-state and individuals.

      Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

      Reminder: We will also finish discussing the Obregon, Bender, and Carson pieces from last week.

      Please also post one of the following:

      • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
      • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

      If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

      ***

      READINGS FOR OCTOBER 10

      1)     Jamie L. Bronstein, Workplace Accidents and Injured Workers in Nineteenth-Century Britain (2008)

      2)     John Williams-Searle, “Cold Charity: Manhood, Brotherhood, and the Transformation of Disability, 1870-1900,” in The New Disability History, pp. 157-186 (MavSpace)

      3)     Greg Eghigian, “Embodied Entitlement: The Policy, Practice, and Politics of Disability Compensation,” in Making Security Social, Disability, Insurance, and the Birth of the Social Entitlement State in Germany (University of Michigan Press, 2000), pp. 67-116 (MavSpace)

      October 3 (Week 7): Fit Citizens? Disability and the Nation-State

      This week we will focus on the relationship between disability and nation-states: how disability has been used to define the character and boundaries of the nation-state and how disability history may shed light on the relevance of the nation-state to transnational history.  We will also look at a more recent historiographic article on the field of disability history.

      Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

      Please also post one of the following:

      • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
      • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

      If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

      ***

      READINGS FOR OCTOBER 3

      Defining Disability History (Redux)

      1)     David Turner, “Disability History: Looking Forward to a Better Past,” History Workshop Journal 71, no. 1 (2011): 283-287 (MavSpace)


      Quarantining the Nation

      1)     Examples of “ugly laws” from Susan M. Schweik, The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public (New York University Press, 2009), pp. 201-206 (MavSpace)

      2)     Douglas C. Baynton, “Defectives in the Land: Disability and American Immigration Policy, 1882-1924,” Journal of American Ethnic History (Spring 2005): 31-44 (MavSpace)

      3)     Daniel Bender, “Perils of Degeneration: Reform, the Savage Immigrant, and the Survival of the Unfit,” Journal of Social History 42, no. 1 (2008): 5-29 (MavSpace)

      4)     Diana Obregón, “Building National Medicine: Leprosy and Power in Colombia, 1870-1910,” Social History of Medicine 15, no. 1 (2002): 89-108 (MavSpace)

      5)     Sandy Sufian, “Mental Hygiene and Disability in the Zionist Project,” Disability Studies Quarterly 27, no. 4 (2007) (available at http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/42/42)


      Measuring Citizens

      1)     John Carson, “The Science of Merit and the Merit of Science: Mental Order and Social Order in Early Twentieth-Century France and America,” in States of Knowledge: The Co-Production of Science and Social Order, ed. Sheila S. Jasanoff (London: Routledge, 2004), pp. 181-205 (MavSpace)

      September 26 (Week 6): Asylums across the Atlantic: Insanity, Colonialism, and Community

      This week we will focus on the transatlantic asylum movement: its goals, its connections to colonialism, and the interaction between asylums and communities.  We will also consider the importance of asylums within disability history and historiography.

      Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

      Please also post one of the following:

      • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
      • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

      If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

      ***

      READINGS FOR SEPTEMBER 26

      1)     Michel Foucault, “The Great Confinement” in Madness & Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason, pp. 38-64 (MavSpace)

      2)     Jonathan Sadowsky, Imperial Bedlam: Institutions of Madness in Colonial Southwest Nigeria (University of California Press, 1999)

      3)     Richard C. Keller, “Pinel in the Maghreb: Liberation, Confinement, and Psychiatric Reform in French North Africa,” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 79:3 (2005): 459-99 (MavSpace)

      4)     James E. Moran, “Asylum in the Community: Managing the Insane in Antebellum America,” History of Psychiatry (1998): 217-240 (MavSpace)

      September 19 (Week 5): Imagining Communities: Debating Deaf Education

      This week we will focus on the ways in which people with and without disabilities have created imagined communities through disability, using debates over deaf education and Deaf communities as a case study.

      Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

      Please also post one of the following:

      • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
      • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

      If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

      ***

      READINGS FOR SEPTEMBER 19

      1)     R. A. R. Edwards, Words Made Flesh: Nineteenth Century Deaf Education and the Growth of Deaf Culture (NYU Press, 2012)

      2)     Leila Monaghan, “A World’s Eye View: Deaf Cultures in Global Perspective,” in Many Ways to Be Deaf: International Variation in Deaf Communities, ed. Leila Monaghan et al (Gallaudet University Press, 2003), pp. 1-24 (MavSpace)

      3)     Choose one of these case studies to read:

      • William O. McCagg, Jr., “Some Problems in the History of Deaf Hungarians,” in Deaf History Unveiled, pp. 252-271 (MavSpace)
      • Iain Hutchinson, “Oralism: A Sign of the Times? The Contest for Deaf Communication in Education Provision in Late Nineteenth-Century Scotland,” European Review of History—Revue européenne d’Histoire 14, no. 4 (December 2007): 481-501 (MavSpace)
      • Anne T. Quartararo, “Republicanism, Deaf Identity, and the Career of Henri Gaillard in Late-Nineteenth-Century France,” in Deaf History Unveiled: Interpretations from the New Scholarship, ed. John Vickrey Van Cleve (Gallaudet University Press, 1993), pp. 40-52 (MavSpace)

      September 12 (Week 4): The Spectacle of the Disabled “Other”

      This week we will focus on the ways in which disability has historically been used to construct hierarchies and “the other.”  Our discussions will focus on three examples: slavery, debates over women’s reproduction and civilization, and the spectacle of  freak shows.

      Please use the comment function to post two discussion questions about this week’s readings by Thursday at 2 pm.  Focus on intriguing or controversial points in the readings that you think will spark discussion.  Strong discussion questions are open-ended, engage with major points in author(s)’ arguments, and are not factual in nature.

      Please also post one of the following:

      • a short description (1-3 sentences) of your “muddiest point,” that is, what important point of the author’s argument did you have trouble grasping
      • your “most interesting connection” for this week’s reading

      If you refer to a specific point or quote in one of the readings, please provide the author and page number.

      ***

      READINGS FOR SEPTEMBER 12

      Slavery & Disability

      1)     Douglas C. Baynton, “Disability and the Justification of Inequality in American History,” in The New Disability History, pp. 33-57 (MavSpace)

      2)      “‘Refuse Slaves’ and the Slave Trade,” in Nielsen, A Disability History of the United States, pp. 41-47 (MavSpace)

      3)     Dea Boster, “‘I Made Up My Mind to Act Both Deaf and Dumb: Displays of Disability and Slave Resistance in the Antebellum American South,” in Disability and Passing: Blurring the Lines of Identity, ed. Jeffrey A. Brune and Daniel J. Wilson (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2013), 71-98 (MavSpace)


      Gender, Monsters, and Savages

      1)     Laura Briggs, “The Race of Hysteria: ‘Overcivilization’ and the ‘Savage’ woman in Late Nineteenth-Century Obstetrics and Gynecology,” American Quarterly 52, no. 5 (June 2000): 246-273 (MavSpace)

      2)     Philip K. Wilson, “Eighteenth-Century ‘Monsters’ and Nineteenth-Century ‘Freaks’:  Reading the Maternally Marked Child,” Literature and Medicine 21, no. 1 (Spring 2002):  1-25 (MavSpace)


      Freak Shows & the Gaze

      1)     Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, “Why Do We Stare?” in Staring: How We Look (Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 3-11 (MavSpace)

      2)     “Introduction: Exhibiting Freaks” in Nadja Durbach, Spectacle of Deformity: Freak Shows and Modern British Culture (University of California Press, 2010), pp. 1-32 (MavSpace)

      3)     Choose one case study to read

      • Holly E. Martin, “Cheng and Eng Bunker, ‘The Original Siamese Twins’: Living, Dying, and Continuing under the the Spectator’s Gaze,” The Journal of American Culture 34, no. 4 (December 2011): 372-388 (MavSpace)
      • Filip Herza, “‘Tiny Artists from the Big World’: The Rhetoric of Representing Extraordinary Bodies during the Singer Midgets’ 1928 Tour in Prague,” in Exploring the Cultural History of Continental European Freak Shows & ‘Enfreakment’, ed. Anna Kérchy and Andrea Zittlau (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012), pp. 193-210 (MavSpace)

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