Archive for category #altac

Digital Humanties – an Expensive Word

The Feb. 18th article in the Chronicle of Higher Education entitled,Stop Calling it ‘Digital Humanities,‘” is a great article encouraging small colleges and liberal arts schools to take part in the digital humanities (DH) movement.  The first suggestion:

“A persistent criticism of the digital-humanities movement is that it is elitist and exclusive because it requires the resources of a major university…Academics and administrators at small liberal-arts colleges may read about DH and, however exciting it sounds, decide that it ill suits their teaching mission.” The Chronicle – Feb. 2013

The article goes on to list several reasons why small schools have an advantage over large schools with big budgets when it comes to the DH movement.

“How does this help me?” the liberal arts major asked, clearly communicating a jaded and dim outlook on the job market.

For starters – not all small schools know they have an advantage.  For the liberal arts major this means OPPORTUNITY! If a small college has a posting for a teaching position, you now have an edge on the competition.  Stating how you can bring the DH movement to a small school in a big way will definitely get the attention of an employer who has decided, “No thanks, to expensive.”

Further, you can show how DH can bring faculty together in their research efforts, a task that is notoriously difficult.

A small college may not have many people who are openly experimenting with the digital humanities, but there are likely to be many who are interested in some aspect of it, especially the ways it can enhance teaching and learning. In particular, reach out to the library staff and the information technologists….Departments such as communication, computer science, and education often include potential allies as well, because they are interested in new media and social media, coding and Web design, instructional technology, hybrid pedagogy, and assessment.”
The Chronicle – Feb. 2013

One of the best ways to get a job is to show that not only are you the best person for it, but that you will add to the success of the institution overall.

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Career Research – How & Why

The “why” portion of this post: Warning! Blanket statement to follow: Research is important because knowledge is power.  If you are considering a job outside of academia, research is essential.

Tips for the “how” portion of this post: Jobs on Toast has a great post about researching jobs in your industry.  However, you need industries of interest in mind before starting.  Good thing there is a post for that too.

Some suggestions:

  • Read books, newspapers and magazines in your chosen industries.
  • Read blogs and listen to pod casts – there is a wealth of information that didn’t make it into the top journals.
  • Network, both in-person and online.  Email HR Reps, create a database of contacts you meet at events, and keep in touch with those people!

There is also an interesting post on creating a Career Roadmap that is broken into four steps: discovering potential, finding a niche, marketing yourself, and getting an offer.  Check it out.

On an unrelated note – LOOK!  It’s Steve Jobs on a piece of toast! Get it? Jobs on Toast? Like, Steve JOBS on Toast?

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