Archive for category #altac

Careers in Higher Education Development

This week, October 20-24, The Versatile PhD is presenting an online panel that discusses careers in Higher Education Development.

 

What exactly is Higher Education Development?

      It’s an exciting and important career field that uses the skills you have developed during graduate school to raise money for colleges and universities in order to support their missions. How can you use the skills you have acquired in graduate school to obtain a job in this field? Well, within Higher Education Development careers, there are proposals to write, campaigns to plan, funding sources to research, and donors to inspire. As you can see, the ability to be successful in this field requires many skills that you have already acquired in graduate school.

      The panel this week focuses on the Humanities and Social Sciences, but anyone with an interest in acquiring a job as a Higher Education Development professional should visit the site. Additionally, this panel will benefit students in master’s and doctoral programs, so we encourage everyone to participate. There are six panelists who will answer any questions you have about this field, including how to get your foot in the door. This is an exciting and growing field, so don’t miss the panel this week.

 
How to participate:

      The panel is asynchronous, which means you can ask a question and the panelists who answer your question will respond throughout the week. The panel goes from October 20 until October 24. In order to participate, you need to register with the site. If you have not already done this, visit the UT Arlington Graduate Studies website in order to affiliate yourself with the university and get the benefits of member institutions.

Click here for the Graduate Studies Website to register

Once you have registered, enter The Versatile PhD website, click on the forums tab, then click on Humanities Forum. The panelists will all introduce themselves today and this gives you background information on their careers and the field in general. To see what people are asking the panelists look for any thread that begins with the word Panel. If you want to ask a question click on the “add topic” button, place the word “Panel” at the beginning of your title and ask a question.

Got it? Great! Then Click Here to visit The Versatile PhD.

Careers in Consulting for Humanities and STEM graduate students

This week on The Versatile PhD there are panels in the Humanities and STEM fields that focus on Careers in Consulting. On both of the panels, you have the opportunity to ask questions to PhD’s who transitioned into the consulting field and find out more about careers in this field. Despite the focus on PhD’s, This panel is beneficial to master’s and doctoral graduate students. It’s never too early to start planning for your career!

In this week’s humanities panel, the experts have their PhD’s in Linguistics, Media Studies, Sociology, Religion, and History. The STEM panel features a Physical-Organic Chemist, Materials Scientist, Physicist, Oceanographer, and Meteorologist. The panelists have introduced themselves on The Versatile PhD, so you can look at their mini-biographies on the site under forums. Panelists will answer any questions you have throughout the week. Don’t be discouraged if none of the panelists are in the same field as you are, they can still offer helpful advice on how to break into the consulting field and be successful in your career!



If you want to ask them a question follow these steps to start the process:

  • Once you are in The Versatile PhD click on Forums at the top of the screen
  • click on the add topic button on the upper right of the forums
  • Begin the title of your thread with the word “Panel” and include a summary of your question in the title


  • Any of the panelists who can answer your question will respond to you throughout the week. Make sure you have your notification set to alert you when someone responds to your thread. If you get into The Versatile PhD and have difficulties, The Office of Graduate Studies is having online “open hours” on adobe connect. You can ask any question about The Versatile PhD and we will help you. We have “open hours” Monday, September 22, 2014 from 2:00pm to 4:00pm, and Thursday from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm.



    If you would like to learn more of the features of The Versatile PhD, attend the adobe connect online session Wednesday, September 24 starting at 5:30 pm where we will discuss all the features that are available to you as part of a member institution. Click here to see our website for more details.

Navigating the Career Search with Versatility


Worried about finding a job after you graduate?


Curious about the different ways you can use your graduate degree?


The Office of Graduate Studies is here to help you explore all the job opportunities that are available to you with your graduate degree. As a student at UT Arlington you now have access to premium content on The Versatile PhD, an online resource to help humanities, social science, and STEM PhD’s identify, prepare for, and succeed in non-academic careers. Even though the name of the website is The Versatile PhD, this resource is valuable to anyone in graduate school. It’s a useful tool to plan your career and get helpful advice from people who have used their graduate degrees to obtain careers outside the academy. This supportive online community is available to answer your questions in addition to many other valuable resources that are on the website. The Versatile PhD offers:


  • HIRED: Authentic resumes and cover letters that got real PhDs their first jobs away from the faculty track, with detailed analysis that describes how they made the non-academic pivot and shows the application and hiring process step by step
  • BIO: Inspiring first‐person stories by experienced non-academic PhDs describing how their careers evolved over several years after moving out of the academy, including promotions, advancement, and signature accomplishments
  • PANEL: Detailed inside information on a wide range of specific PhD‐friendly careers provided by PhDs in those careers, along with their answers to grad student questions. The first panel will be the week of September 22 through September 29, 2014. The panel will discuss careers in consulting for both humanities and STEM PhD’s.

The Versatile PhD also offers PhD discussion forums, local meetup groups, and job listings posted by members.


Worried that someone might find out you visited Versatile PhD? There is complete confidentiality on the site. That means nothing you write on the site will ever show up on the internet. Plus you can select your own user name, which means you can choose the level of anonymity that you want. Click here to register for The Versatile PhD and start planning your future today!

Digital Humanties – an Expensive Word

The Feb. 18th article in the Chronicle of Higher Education entitled,Stop Calling it ‘Digital Humanities,‘” is a great article encouraging small colleges and liberal arts schools to take part in the digital humanities (DH) movement.  The first suggestion:

“A persistent criticism of the digital-humanities movement is that it is elitist and exclusive because it requires the resources of a major university…Academics and administrators at small liberal-arts colleges may read about DH and, however exciting it sounds, decide that it ill suits their teaching mission.” The Chronicle – Feb. 2013

The article goes on to list several reasons why small schools have an advantage over large schools with big budgets when it comes to the DH movement.

“How does this help me?” the liberal arts major asked, clearly communicating a jaded and dim outlook on the job market.

For starters – not all small schools know they have an advantage.  For the liberal arts major this means OPPORTUNITY! If a small college has a posting for a teaching position, you now have an edge on the competition.  Stating how you can bring the DH movement to a small school in a big way will definitely get the attention of an employer who has decided, “No thanks, to expensive.”

Further, you can show how DH can bring faculty together in their research efforts, a task that is notoriously difficult.

A small college may not have many people who are openly experimenting with the digital humanities, but there are likely to be many who are interested in some aspect of it, especially the ways it can enhance teaching and learning. In particular, reach out to the library staff and the information technologists….Departments such as communication, computer science, and education often include potential allies as well, because they are interested in new media and social media, coding and Web design, instructional technology, hybrid pedagogy, and assessment.”
The Chronicle – Feb. 2013

One of the best ways to get a job is to show that not only are you the best person for it, but that you will add to the success of the institution overall.

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Career Research – How & Why

The “why” portion of this post: Warning! Blanket statement to follow: Research is important because knowledge is power.  If you are considering a job outside of academia, research is essential.

Tips for the “how” portion of this post: Jobs on Toast has a great post about researching jobs in your industry.  However, you need industries of interest in mind before starting.  Good thing there is a post for that too.

Some suggestions:

  • Read books, newspapers and magazines in your chosen industries.
  • Read blogs and listen to pod casts – there is a wealth of information that didn’t make it into the top journals.
  • Network, both in-person and online.  Email HR Reps, create a database of contacts you meet at events, and keep in touch with those people!

There is also an interesting post on creating a Career Roadmap that is broken into four steps: discovering potential, finding a niche, marketing yourself, and getting an offer.  Check it out.

On an unrelated note – LOOK!  It’s Steve Jobs on a piece of toast! Get it? Jobs on Toast? Like, Steve JOBS on Toast?

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