Posts Tagged resume

Get Down to Business About Your Career

One of my hands is hot and the other is cold.  The reason I notice this is because I have decided the put my hands up to my chin like Sherlock Holmes (Cumberbatch, not Downey Jr.).  I can’t think.  Sadly, the hand-to-chin-thing is useless for me.  The holidays are around the corner and my head is spinning.  New Year’s Eve is so close and another year is almost gone.

Times like these are GREAT times for career reflections.  As much as personal reflections and road maps to happiness, weight loss, and world travel, are created with intense desire most naturally these times of year, career development seems to take up only the smallest moment in time.  Believe it or not, it is probably easier to move forward career-wise than it is to lose 20 lbs. or plan a trip around the world (cough, money, cough).

I typically stick to academic-type career sources in this blog, but today I want to mention Bold Career’s Holiday Post.  First – the name of this Career Development firm is BOLD CAREER.  It is great!  The author of the post and firm’s fearless leader, Ian Christie, was the former Senior Director at Monster.com.  So – yes – it is a business-esque article with some very business-ish suggestions that you can probably ignore.  But, overall this article is a New-Year-Get-Motivated-You-Can-Do-It-Waahoooo-Go-Get-’em Career Guide, neatly sectioned in phases, numbered, and sub-headed with letters (Social, Reflective, and New Beginnings).  While the photo of the board room makes me feel physically ill, the content is WORTH IT.

Oh how this article dragged me out of a deep, dark hole.  I have been here before folks and I am sure that I will be here again (next year and the year after).  It is nice to have something tangible to help you get down to it; to help you roll your sleeves up (old sweat shirt, robe, adult onesie, ANY type of sleeves will do) and just challenge that part of your brain that likes to watch television until 3 a.m. and procrastinate on comps.  This corporate guy has a lot to offer advice-wise, and I think even The Dude would approve.

My favorite quote by Christie is when he discusses removing roadblocks. He writes, “Let’s face it. We can have a lot of baggage.” Haaaa.  I have baggage that is for sure.  I also have a Netflix account so there is like, a third of my life gone.  I am really looking forward to working through these phases over the winter break and I hope you are too!  Let me know  how it works out – or if you want to discuss, I am available.  Just email ashleyh@uta.edu.  Spend some time this holiday getting down to business about your career and get competitive in the market place.  It is a rough world out there.  Even Santa knows he needs to corner the market if he wants to stay relevant! (Just kidding, Santa would never do that to the Easter Bunny – not even a Milka Chocolate Santa).

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Cover Letters

Take it from someone (Karen Kelsky, aka, The Professor) who has read approx 2200 cover letters: YOUR COVER LETTER PROBABLY STINKS!  Below, I have highlighted some some errors many students make straight from her amazing and seriously helpful site – The Professor Is In.

-Too long
-Not on letter head
-Doesn’t follow business letter etiquette
-Contains way to much info on your dissertation
-You label yourself as a student (rather than colleague)

Relate to some of these common mistakes? For more reasons your cover letter   probably stinks – and HOW to make it BETTER, check out the Professor’s blog article.

Check out the CV Writing workshop coming up at UT Arlington!

June 12 @ 12:30 p.m.

Room 303, Chemistry and Physics Building

Register on the EDGE site. FREE LUNCH!

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Digital Humanties – an Expensive Word

The Feb. 18th article in the Chronicle of Higher Education entitled,Stop Calling it ‘Digital Humanities,‘” is a great article encouraging small colleges and liberal arts schools to take part in the digital humanities (DH) movement.  The first suggestion:

“A persistent criticism of the digital-humanities movement is that it is elitist and exclusive because it requires the resources of a major university…Academics and administrators at small liberal-arts colleges may read about DH and, however exciting it sounds, decide that it ill suits their teaching mission.” The Chronicle – Feb. 2013

The article goes on to list several reasons why small schools have an advantage over large schools with big budgets when it comes to the DH movement.

“How does this help me?” the liberal arts major asked, clearly communicating a jaded and dim outlook on the job market.

For starters – not all small schools know they have an advantage.  For the liberal arts major this means OPPORTUNITY! If a small college has a posting for a teaching position, you now have an edge on the competition.  Stating how you can bring the DH movement to a small school in a big way will definitely get the attention of an employer who has decided, “No thanks, to expensive.”

Further, you can show how DH can bring faculty together in their research efforts, a task that is notoriously difficult.

A small college may not have many people who are openly experimenting with the digital humanities, but there are likely to be many who are interested in some aspect of it, especially the ways it can enhance teaching and learning. In particular, reach out to the library staff and the information technologists….Departments such as communication, computer science, and education often include potential allies as well, because they are interested in new media and social media, coding and Web design, instructional technology, hybrid pedagogy, and assessment.”
The Chronicle – Feb. 2013

One of the best ways to get a job is to show that not only are you the best person for it, but that you will add to the success of the institution overall.

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