Monthly Archive for September, 2013

Research addresses barriers faced by nonprofit organizations

by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

File photo

Dr. Karabi Bezboruah’s paper “Community Organizing for Health Care: An Analysis of the Process” was published in the Journal of Community Practice, Vol 21.

A blog post discussing Bezboruah’s paper and its relevance notes, “New research from The University of Texas at Arlington presents three ways to overcome common barriers that nonprofits face when building capacity to address community needs.”

The blog post states, “Bezboruah offers three conclusions to overcome the nearly universal barriers of exclusion of low-income individuals, stake-holders’ misaligned ideologies and approaches, and public apathy. And they’re not all that different from previous community-based participatory initiatives.”

The post found on  Georgia Nonprofit NOW, a blog from the Georgia Center for Nonprofits, outlines Bezboruah’s conclusions as noted below:

Grassroots identification of the problem: Allowing the service beneficiaries to identify the needs of their community will translate to more appropriately informed results as potential solutions and the organizational processes develop.

Identification of community specific solutions through collaborative discussions: With the leadership of a facilitator and the inclusion of all stake-holders — community members, service providers, public officials, and beneficiaries — in the development of goals and objectives, consensus can be achieved, creating more holistic solutions to the community-identified issues.

Building public buy-in: Advocacy is an essential piece of nonprofits’ responsibility in their communities (and even more broadly for more universal issues). Through the “use of community resources to educate the public and generate opinion about the critical problems faced by the community,” awareness and support can be built among stake-holders and the general public alike.

SUPA scholarships awarded

The Scholarship Committee for the School of Urban and Public Affairs awarded the following scholarships for the 2013/2014 academic year:

  • Callie Brown awarded the George C. Campbell Endowed Scholarship
  • Kim Jungsoo, Kim Kukhyoung, and Reza Farajifard awarded the Paul Geisel Endowed Scholarship
  • Wayne Beggs, John Powers, and Kiranmayi Raparthi awarded the John W. Jackson Endowed Scholarship
  • Eihua Corinne Shaw  and Brenda Jackson awarded the R. L. “Jerry” Mebus Memorial Scholarship
  • Anisa Heirani awarded the Nancy L. and Edward S. Overman Endowed Scholarship
  • Polycarp Birika awarded the Del Taebel Distance Education Scholarship
  • Rene Argueta awarded the David and Jerry Tees Endowed Scholarship
  • William Addington, Ali Adil, and Raha Pouladi awarded the Trey and Shana Yelverton Endowed Scholarship
  • Hamid Hajjafari, Mehrnaz Mehraein, Zoha Niazi, Sirwan Shahooie, and Mehrdad Vaziri awarded the Dean’s Excellence Scholarship
  • Ann Mai awarded the Interdisciplinary Studies Scholarship

Alumnus doing transportation research at the University of Illinois at Chicago

by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

Alumnus Havan Surat holds the position of Research Transportation Planner in the Urban Transportation Center in the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Surat says he works primarily on Department of Transportation projects related to academic research at both the federal and state level.

Prior to moving to Chicago, Surat worked for the City of Fort Worth in the Planning and Development Department. His article titled Three-Dimensional Spatial Analytics and Modeling Is Now SOP for the City of Forth Worth, Texaswas published in ArcNews.

Surat holds a Master of City and Regional Planning Degree from The University of Texas at Arlington’s School of Urban and Public Affairs as well as a Masters in Urban Design from the University of Texas, Austin.

Dr. Audirac addresses impact of shrinking cities at international conference

by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

Photo courtesy Ivonne Audirac

Dr. Ivonne Audirac was an invited discussant at a roundtable that addressed ‘The Global Challenge of Shrinking Cities’ as part of the Cities Regrowing Smaller conference held recently in Essen, Germany.

The European Cooperation for Science and Technology website states, “To deal with the results of demographic, economic and physical contraction processes and to plan for the future of considerably smaller but nevertheless livable cities accordingly is one of the most challenging tasks in the near future.”

The site notes the purpose of the conference was to, “bring together experts from different arenas to share their knowledge on the shrinking cities process and to discuss possible approaches to deal with shrinkage.”

PUAD student advances in law enforcement career

by Sara Abraham-Oxford

Christopher Cook, a student in SUPA’s Public and Urban Administration Ph.D. program, was promoted from sergeant to lieutenant in the Arlington Police Department. Lieutenant Cook serves as supervisor of the department’s Office of Communication/Media Unit.

Photo by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

Cook enrolled in the PUAD program following discussions with others in law enforcement, including Dr. Theron Bowman, a SUPA Distinguished Alumnus who was Arlington Police Chief at the time. “Networking outside of law enforcement is very important as you go higher in your profession,” Cook said. “The diversity of the program really broadens one’s horizons.”

Discussing his experience with the PUAD program, Cook noted that it has enhanced his approach at work. “Decision-making becomes less arbitrary and more of a process where you give more thought to the consequences of your decisions.” He also expressed appreciation for the size of classes at the graduate level, which were small enough to allow him to build valuable relationships with fellow students and faculty.

Congratulations to Lieutenant Cook!