Archive for the 'Faculty' Category

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Dr. Audirac addresses impact of shrinking cities at international conference

by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

Photo courtesy Ivonne Audirac

Dr. Ivonne Audirac was an invited discussant at a roundtable that addressed ‘The Global Challenge of Shrinking Cities’ as part of the Cities Regrowing Smaller conference held recently in Essen, Germany.

The European Cooperation for Science and Technology website states, “To deal with the results of demographic, economic and physical contraction processes and to plan for the future of considerably smaller but nevertheless livable cities accordingly is one of the most challenging tasks in the near future.”

The site notes the purpose of the conference was to, “bring together experts from different arenas to share their knowledge on the shrinking cities process and to discuss possible approaches to deal with shrinkage.”

Dr. Ko researches effects of shade trees on building performance in Sacramento

by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

Photo Credit: Sacramento Tree Foundation website

Through a project titled Monitoring and Modeling Tree Growth, Longevity and Performance, Dr. Yekang Ko states she, “will examine the effects of shade trees on building energy performance in Sacramento, CA.”

According to Ko, the prime sponsor of the study is the United States Forest Service.

“Using field surveys and remote sensing technologies,” Ko said she will “conduct time series analysis to document changes in tree survival, growth, and energy performance for a sample of Sacramento shade trees planted by Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) around 254 residences from 1991-1993.”

She goes on to say, “This database will be used with the building energy model to calculate effects of each Sacramento Shade Program tree on respective building energy performance over the 20-year period. The long-term effectiveness of different species and locations will be assessed.”

Ko is a professor in the City and Regional Planning Program in the School of Urban and Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Arlington.

Congratulations and best wishes to Dr. Sherman Wyman who retires with 41 years of service

Post and photo by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

Drs. Wyman and Cole (left to right)

Dr. Sherman Wyman is retiring from the University of Texas at Arlington after 41 years of dedicated service to the University and the School of Urban and Public Affairs (SUPA).

At his retirement reception held April 16, 2013, Dr. Richard Cole spoke highly of Wyman and his contributions to both the School and the University.

Among the accomplishments noted were Wyman’s service as Director of the Institute of Urban Studies from 1972 to 1978 and later, as the Director of the Center for Economic Development, Research, and Services (CEDRAS).  Both the Institute and the Center provided research and services to cities throughout the state of Texas.

In addition, Wyman obtained federal funding to develop Public Administration and Management programs in the countries of Ukraine, Serbia, and Montenegro.  He also served as the Principle Investigator on a Department of Justice (DOJ) grant, Project Safe Neighborhoods: Reduction of Gun-related Violence in Target Neighborhoods in Dallas.

Dr. Wyman spoke very briefly thanking his many guests that included family members, SUPA faculty and staff, officials from various cities, alumni, and students.

Richard Cole honored by the Urban Affairs Association

by Joanne Lovito-Nelson

Dr. Richard Cole (file photo)

In a unanimous vote of the Urban Affairs Association (UAA) Governing Board, Dr. Richard Cole was inducted as a member of the UAA Service Honor Roll.

In a letter to Cole, the Governing Board noted that the award is well-deserved and stated, “On behalf of the many urbanists who have benefited from your work, and the future generations who will build upon its foundation, we offer our heartfelt gratitude.”

The letter went on to say, “The Urban Affairs Association has created the UAA Service Honor Roll to recognize those members who have contributed outstanding service over the years to the association.”

Cole, along with other honorees, will be recognized at the UAA conference to be held in San Francisco this April.

The association’s website states, “The Urban Affairs Association (UAA) is the international professional organization for urban scholars, researchers, and public service professionals.”

To learn more about the association, visit the UAA website.

SUPA Welcome Bash

Welcome back School of Urban and Public Affairs students.

SUPA is hosting a Welcome Bash for all new and returning students on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Meet us at the Library Mall for hamburgers and say hello to our faculty and your fellow students. You’ll even have a chance to win our drawing for SUPA T-shirts and other goodies.

Meet our new faculty members

The School of Urban and Public Affairs is excited to have two new faculty members joining us this semester:

David Arditi, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies

Before joining UT Arlington, David Arditi earned his Ph.D. from George Mason University in Cultural Studies. At GMU, Arditi taught classes on interdisciplinary studies, globalization and cultural studies. His dissertation explores the condition of the music industry during the transition to digital music production and demonstrates that contrary to the recording industry’s stated position that digital music has harmed the industry, major record labels are in a stronger position today as a result of this digital transformation. Furthermore, it shows that the music industry led this transformation rather than reacting to it. Broadly speaking, Arditi’s research lies at the intersection of cultural studies, media studies and political theory.

Dr. Arditi will teach INTS 4301 – Interdisciplinary Research Process this semester.

Yekang Ko, Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning

Before joining UT Arlington, Ye Kang Ko received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2012. At Cal, Ko worked at the Center for Metropolitan Studies and taught courses in GIS and environmental planning. Ko’s research focuses on quantitative assessment of urban sustainability using spatial analysis. Her research and teaching support the long-term resilience of built environments that minimize energy consumption and maximize on-site renewable energy utilization. She is also interested in international planning in the Asia-Pacific region. Her works are based on environmental planning, science, policy and active collaboration with local governments and NGOs.

Dr. Ko’s dissertation research on energy efficient solar cities classifies the energy performance of neighborhoods and as a spin off this research, she has recently submitted an revised article to the Journal of Planning Literature that reviews design principles and research findings related to urban form and energy use. She has also submitted to the Journal of the American Planning Association the article entitled “Solar Sprawl Versus Compact Neighborhoods: Assessing an Optimum Urban Density for Energy Sustainability,” coauthored with K. Jang, D.J. Radke, and R. Cervero.

Dr. Ko will teach CIRP 5327 – Introduction to Green Cities and Transportation this semester.

Grodach earns NEA grant to study the impact of the arts on cities

Carl Grodach

Congratulations Carl Grodach, PhD, Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning at the School of Urban and Public Affairs! He recently earned a unique grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to study the impact of the arts on cities.

Read more about his NEA grant in this news release from The University of Texas at Arlington:

Continue reading ‘Grodach earns NEA grant to study the impact of the arts on cities’

Connor earns fellowship at James Weldon Johnson Institute at Emory University

Michan Connor

Connor

Michan Connor, Ph.D., assistant professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, will spend the 2012-13 academic year on leave from UTA as a Visiting Scholar at the James Weldon Johnson Institute (JWJI) at Emory University in Atlanta. The JWJI, an interdisciplinary research institute funded by the Mellon Foundation,  supports research on the history and ongoing legacy of the civil rights movement and its connections to other movements for justice and equality.

Connor will spend his time in residency in Atlanta researching the historical roots and contemporary politics of a movement by residents of several of Atlanta’s northern suburbs to separate from Fulton County and form a separate Milton County. Opponents have argued that this move would exacerbate significant racial inequalities in the metropolitan area and institutionalize racial and class segregation, while proponents contend that their effort is unrelated  to race and simply seeks to empower local communities. By studying how those communities were formed in a longer historical perspective, he will explore links between community, local government, and open and hidden forms of racial ideology to evaluate the claim made by several prominent sociologists that the fragmentation of metropolitan areas into  communities of high and low opportunity is the most important civil rights challenge of our time.

More faculty publications and presentations

The School of Urban and Public Affairs faculty has been busy. Check out the latest roundup of recent publications and presentations from our talented faculty:

Richard ColeRichard Cole, PhD, Professor of Urban and Public Affairs

Attachments to Multiple Communities and Public Ambivalence Toward Immigration in the United States,” in Jack Jedwab and John Kincaid, eds., Identities, Trust, and Cohesion in Federal Countries: Perspectives from Public Opinion, (McGill-Queen’s Press), 2012.

Attachments and Identification in Federal States,” (with J. Kincaid), Canadian Issues, summer/fall, 2012).

The Current Status and Roles of State of State Advisory Commissions on Intergovernmental Relations in the U.S. Federal System,Public Administration Review, 2011.

Trickle Down Economics Texas Style:  Impacts of the Texas Budget Crisis on Local Governments,” The Ideas Quarterly Report, 2011.

Citizen Attitudes Toward Issues of Federalism in Canada, Mexico, and the United States,” (with J. Kincaid), Publius: The Journal of Federalism, 2011.

Implications of Public Trust and Confidence in Orders of Government for Intergovernmental Boundaries in Four Federal Countries,” (with J. Kincaid), Annual Meeting of the International Political Science Association, July, 2012.

Attitudinal Evidence for the North American Political Culture Concept,” (with R. Whelan) Annual Meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association, June 17, 2012.

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Michan ConnorMichan Connor, PhD, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies

Holding the Center: Images of Urbanity on Television in Los Angeles, 1950-1970,” scheduled for publication in the Summer 2012 issue of the Southern California Quarterly, the peer-reviewed journal of the Historical Society of Southern California.

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David CourseyDavid Coursey, PhD, Director of Public Administration

Decisions in Research Review Boards: The Role of Individual Characteristics and Communication Medium,” in Public Integrity, Spring 2012 with Yushim Kim, Deirdre Hahn.

Empirical Validation of the Relative Autonomy Index – A Self-Determination Perspective on Work Motivation in the Public Sector,” paper presented at International research Society for Public Management, Rome, Italy, April 2012, with Wouter Vandenabeele.

Click here to see more SUPA faculty publications.

SUPA faculty members join Richard Florida to discuss growth and economic development in North Texas

Richard Florida and UTA President James Spaniolo. Photo courtesy University Communications.

Richard Florida, founder of the Creative Class Group and Visiting Distinguished Research Scholar at The University of Texas at Arlington, led a symposium at UT Arlington earlier this month on growth and economic development in the North Texas region.

The symposium, titled “Stronger Together: An Interactive Conversation About Our Region,” featured conversations and panel discussions with UTA President James Spaniolo, Florida, his team from the Creative Class Group, and regional experts including SUPA Faculty members Carl Grodach and Andrew Whittemore. Grodach spoke on a panel about the role of culture-based industries in regional economic development and Whittemore was on a panel addressing historic and current areas for improvement in transportation and land use policy.

The experts focused on how DFW communities can compete globally by working together to bolster economic growth, attract and retain members of the “creative class” of workers, increase research and technology by supporting the region’s universities.

Read more about the Stronger Together Symposium:

UT Arlington has partnered with the Creative Class Group since 2010 to examine the Metroplex’s strengths and weaknesses as a region and to engage faculty, students and other stakeholders in conversations about the region’s future growth and economic development. And, the partnership will continue—Florida and his colleague Steven Pedigo will serve as Distinguished Visiting Research Scholars in the School of Urban and Public Affairs through the next academic year.