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Archery club members debate City Council ordinance

By J. L. Pinson
Staff Writer
Several bow-and-arrow enthusiasts came to Monday’s Fort Worth City Council meeting to protest a regulation against arrow shooting within 50 yards of a residence, public park, trail or road.

“We have a problem with the regulation,” said Dennis Ballard of the Fort Worth Area Archers. “It would essentially prohibit bow shooting in the city limits.”

Fifth District Councilman Karl Kruse requested the report suggesting the 50-yard rule. The city staff decided against a total prohibition on arrow shooting because the State Department of Conservation has recorded only eight bow-hunting accidents in the last 10 years.

“The issue of bow hunting in the city is not really a public safety issue,” Ballard said. Kruse asked Ballard to submit his comments in writing. Kruse said he wanted to discuss the possible regulation with interested parties before the Council took any further action.

William Elder of 2105 Rock Quarry Road told Council members that bow hunting helps solve the city’s deer-population problem. He said cars have killed many deer in his neighborhood.

“The only real solution is to kill them,” Ballard said. “Anything we can do to encourage bow hunters is a wise move.”

Later, Ballard said requiring bow hunters to take safety-training courses could be another solution to the problem, which would allow hunters to safely use bow and arrows to control the deer population.

Council members agreed to investigate safety-training courses as an option before placing it on future meeting agenda.

Several bow-and-arrow enthusiasts came to Monday’s Fort Worth City Council meeting to protest a regulation against arrow shooting within 50 yards of a residence, public park, trail or road.

“We have a problem with the regulation,” said Dennis Ballard of the Fort Worth Area Archers. “It would essentially prohibit bow shooting in the city limits.”

Fifth District Councilman Karl Kruse requested the report suggesting the 50-yard rule. The city staff decided against a total prohibition on arrow shooting because the State Department of Conservation has recorded only eight bow-hunting accidents in the last 10 years.

“The issue of bow hunting in the city is not really a public safety issue,” Ballard said. Kruse asked Ballard to submit his comments in writing. Kruse said he wanted to

discuss the possible regulation with interested parties before the Council took any

further action.

William Elder of 2105 Rock Quarry Road told Council members that bow hunting helps solve the city’s deer-population problem. He said cars have killed many deer in his neighborhood.

“The only real solution is to kill them,” Ballard said. “Anything we can do to encourage bow hunters is a wise move.”

Later, Ballard said requiring bow hunters to take safety-training courses could be another solution to the problem, which would allow hunters to safely use bow and arrows to control the deer population.

Council members agreed to investigate safety-training courses as an option before placing it on future meeting agenda.

Some Fort Worth Archery Club members spoke against the City Council's bow-and-arrow hunting policies during the Monday night meeting. Photo courtesy of fwarchery.com